Energy Performance Certificate (EPC)

We can evaluate your property to let you know where your property stands in terms of energy efficiency. Our techniques and equipment are combined with the experience, knowledge, and expertise of our EPC assessors. This allows us to provide the most accurate and professional energy performance certificates. Our EPC assessors are fully accredited and hold insurance and disclosure checks. This means you are fully covered. We offer EPC solutions for both commercial and residential properties. Whether you are selling, buying, leasing, or renting a property, and remember an EPC is a legal requirement. Our competitive service is equally effective for estate agents, solicitors, landlords, and tenants.

WHAT IS AN EPC?

An Energy Performance Certificate, or EPC for short, is a legal document that is required if you are selling or letting a property. The incoming resident must be given this document. The EPC shows the energy rating of the property at the date the assessment was carried out. Your estate agent, solicitor and your letting agent will require this document.

The EPC Certificate gives the property an energy rating from A, the highest to G, the lowest. It will also give guidance on the estimated energy running costs of a property along with recommended improvements that will make the home more energy efficient and cheaper to run.

If the property is for renting, then the EPC must be at least an E energy rating. Properties that are an F or G rating, cannot legally be let until improvements have been made to bring it up to the Minimum Energy Efficiency Standard (MEES). For more information on MEES click here.

The EPC is carried out by a qualified and acredited Domestic Energy Assessor (DEA). The Assessor needs to visit the property to gather information about the existing lighting, heating, glazing and insulation, as well as take dimension of the property. This information is then entered into Government approved software to produce your EPC.

The visit typically takes between 30 and 60 minutes depending on the complexity of the property. The EPC is then normally emailed to you within 3 working days. Whilst undertaking the assessment, the Assessor has to take photos which are required for auditing purposes.

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Residential EPCs

DEA is a licensed Domestic Energy Assessor, a person who has undergone specific training in energy performance of buildings using RdSAP methodology. RdSAP is an acronym for Reduced Data Standard Assessment Procedure.

This method is used for smaller domestic dwellings whereas full SAP is applied to new build homes.

The DEA’s job encompasses a number of areas.

The data required to allow the calculation of an EPC includes the following:

The DEA must on arrival at your property conduct a health & safety survey around the exterior and interior of the property – a ‘risk analysis’ to identify potential risks to safety.

The assessor will take dimensions throughout the property to work out the area considered as “space heating” – to determine heat loss through walls and ceilings for example.

Inspection of boilers, room heaters, fireplaces and heating controls will also be surveyed. The type of fuels to heat the home will also be recorded.

Any extensions to the property will be surveyed including the year of build and the construction type noted (eg stone, solid brick, cavity etc.)

The main house construction will be surveyed and the age of build noted.

If an “unseparated” Conservatory is present the dimensions and build age will also be recorded if one exists. For the purpose of doubt a “separated” conservatory is one where access to the conservatory is through an exterior quality door and is exempt from the energy survey.

The property will be inspected to establish what insulation is present, both in walls and loft. Loft access is required if there is one (assessor must use their own ladder).

Types of glazing and low energy lighting will also be recorded.

All data will be recorded on a property datasheet or PDA for download into a specialised computer program, which analyses the data and produces an EPC (Energy Performance Certificate).

The DEA will then issue the EPC to client or agent and explain the report findings.

The Minimum Energy Efficiency Standard (MEES) which came into force in England and Wales on 1 April 2018, applies to private rented residential and non-domestic property and is aimed at encouraging landlords and property owners to improve the energy efficiency of their properties by a restriction on the granting and continuation of existing tenancies where the property has an Energy Performance Certificate Rating of F and G.

Commercial EPC Certificate

In order to produce Commercial EPC, it is first necessary to visit the premises. These surveys can only be carried out by Non-domestic assessors, our assessors hold all the necessary qualifications, experience and accreditation including Insurance and Disclosure checks, to enable them to produce Commercial EPC‘s.

The data gathered during the survey is then used to run the commercial EPC calculations using the government approved software [SBEM].

The total heat loss is worked out for all the thermal elements of the premises and this is then combined with the efficiency of heating, lighting and air conditioning systems to work out the overall rating.

This rating is called an Asset rating, the asset rating is shown in graphical format on a scale of A (most efficient) to G (less efficient) and includes a numerical value. These rating can then be used to make comparisons with comparable buildings.

When an EPC is provided it is also accompanied by a recommendations report, which provides recommendations on how the performance of the building can be enhanced, together with an indication of the likely payback period.

EPC‘s are not required for some type of buildings: such as places of worship, those that are stand alone and low energy demand and less that 50m2 and any that are scheduled for demolition.

EPC‘s have been introduced to help improve energy efficiency of buildings. Since October 2008 it has been a legal requirement that commercial and public buildings must have one, whenever a property is sold, built, rented or leased. This certificate should be made available as soon as marketing commences.

The landlord and sellers/vendors has the responsibility for providing the EPC with the building particulars at the time of sale or lease.

The Minimum Energy Efficiency Standard (MEES) which came into force in England and Wales on 1 April 2018, applies to private rented residential and non-domestic property and is aimed at encouraging landlords and property owners to improve the energy efficiency of their properties by a restriction on the granting and continuation of existing tenancies where the property has an Energy Performance Certificate Rating of F and G.

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